Fire Maple FMS-105: Excellent hiking stove at a great price


#1

Like most newbie hikers, my first hiking stove was a MSR Pocket Rocket: Light, small, almost indestructable…brilliant! The only downside of cooking on a small stove sitting on top of gas canister, is that you constantly feel like you’re at risk of knocking it all over and having your dinner end up in the dirt…

Enter the Fire Maple FMS-105 hiking stove!


It’s slightly heavier and bigger than the pocket-rocket-style gas stoves, but it makes up for it in stability and ease of use. It connects to the gas canister via a hose, so it sits on the ground (low center of gravity). Because it is closer to the ground you can use the standard aluminium windshield which allows you to cook in fairly strong winds with comfort. It has a built in Piezo igniter which is super handy, but after using my windshield, the heat that built up underneath the stove actually melted the igniter.

The other benefit of having a hose-fed stove is that if you run out of gas, you can change out the gas canister without touching your red-hot stove.

I would highly recommend this stove. You can get them from Outdoor Warehouse.


#2

I have found these kind of pot stabilizers works quite well to give that little bit of extra balance to the stove and stirring of the pot.


#3

What a great little invention! Does the gas canister fit into the little grooves/clips? What does it weigh?


#4

Correct, so the base of the gas canister clips into those grooves. Also fits both sizes canister and weighs only 30g. Also folds up quite small as the feet locks inwards.


#5

I agree with Arno.
I have a Fire Maple FMS-117T
Very happy with it


#6

I have one of these stabiliser thingies - came with my Jetboil Sumo stove (family stove, 1,7L pot). My MSR Windboiler also came with one, only difference is that the legs fold down and out, rather than just straight out. Works well for stability (except in heavy wind - mine has been blown over in the Drakensberg a couple of times).
Another benefit is that it raises the gas cannister off the ground, thereby keeping it warmer (the cold soil or rock will make the cannister cool down much faster than the surrounding air) which means that your stove will be able to extract gas out of the gas cannister in much colder conditions.
Does the fire Maple stove have a pressure regulator?
This is a really important item for me as eith it my stoves can extract every last gram of gas from the cannister, which means that on a longer hike I only need to carry one small cannister for 5 days in the mountains.


#7

Another big thumbs up for the FM-105. Mine has performed very well despite me ruining the igniter when I boiled my perculator dry and pretty much ruined it​:rage::joy:.

On www.alpkit.com here is an interesting version with a heat transfer tube for the serious cold weather users. At the price I would much rather replace my FM-105 a few times though…

https://www.alpkit.com/products/koro


#8

As far as I know, the FMS-105 does not have a pressure regulator. I’ve not tested a 220g gas canister over 5 days, but the 440g canisters easily last me 6 days with the FMS-105.
It’s quite a rudimentary stove, but very good value for money.


#9

That Koro stove looks exactly like the Fire Maple Fire-Fleet stove (FMS-118), or probably the Fire Maple looks like the Koro.


#10

Exactly! But the PRICE!! LOL


#11

I have just ordered a gas burner for my Trangia, via the .Aliexpress App. Approx R250 plus whatever Customs add. I currently have a modified Kovea Booster +1 multifuel burner fitted in the Trangia, which has a very noisy roarer burner, and although it works really well, is losing me hiking companions fast.