Tracking pole tents

Hey guys,
Does anyone use a tracking pole tent?
If so, where can I find one?
I’m trying to get my base weight down.

Thanks and happy hiking… :blush:
Steph

Hi

Best bet would be to buy it online. Then post it to a family member or friend who is coming over.

Look at reviews and find the one you like.

Buy once cry once.

Enjoy

Blueberry

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I spent a lot of money getting a Dyneema tent from Tarptent. It is the only type of material I would use with a trekking pole setup. The reason being nylon’s water absorbing qualities causing it to stretch. This makes a tent that rely on being staked to the ground and propped up by trekking poles very susceptible to sagging/wind damage… or frequently adjusting tension on the flysheet…which will happen during rain, early mornings etc.
Lowering your base weight always translates into serious big bucks. (tent and sleeping bag being the most expensive)
Or you could just get a super nasty bivvy setup… :grinning:

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:: grinning::

Thank you @MasterMo.
I can’t wrap my head around a Bivvy yet. Lol
I’ll stick with what I have for the moment.

Thank you for the advice. It’s appreciated!

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It’s the cry once that has me cringing! :joy:
Thnx for the reply @Blueberry.
It’s appreciated.
:+1:

I’ve used a Geertop pyramid for a while. It’s ok but does sag a bit overnight, but it’s served me well. Saying that, I’ve never had it tested by extreme conditions yet, but it has handled heavy rain without wind. But as a 3 season tent weighing around a kg and costing just over $100 at the time it’s been a good buy. It’s a bit tight inside but I manage and I’m 1.78m

Hi

Here is a link to one on an online store in SA. I think the physical store is in Somerset West
(Its sold out but its something)

Here is a rewiew:

Edit: Fixed typo

I actually Googled Geertop earlier today. “Darwin on the Trail” on YouTube suggested the tent as a very good buy at a very reasonable price.

You’ve just confirmed it.
Thank you @andyoung!

Like someone mentioned earlier, lowering the base weight comes at a price.
A steep one at that.
Thank you @Spaniel I appreciate you getting back to me!

Pleasure. The other hassle is that it is not freestanding. But it depends what you’re planning to use it for.

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I’ve been using a Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo, single trekking pole tent. Little bit fiddly getting used to the setup (Don’t follow their instructions!) and seam sealing it was a learning experience. But really a crazy bargain if you have a way to get it back from the US/UK.

Not entirely sold on going bivy/tarp at this point but wanted a lightweight 1 person option. Lunar Solo is affordable, single pole, silpoly which means no water absorption or sag, very roomy and with a decent vestibule as well. Plus one piece bathtub with netting. I have no fondness of mozzis :sweat_smile:

Issues I could see. Condensation as always with a single wall tent, but haven’t had an issue yet. Not sure on the lightweight zips, but all working at the moment. Need to seam seal, supply two extra guy lines and stakes. Haven’t had it in too aggressive weather yet, but they seem to stand up to pretty significant through hikes :man_shrugging:

Overall great starting point at the price. If you already carry a pole, fully contained shelter at like 800g. And I really can’t understate the roominess. I’m 6 foot and a bit, and can be comfortably sleeping in it with every bit of gear I have unpacked around me inside the tent.

If money wasn’t a factor vs how often I actually get out? The Mountain Laurel Design Solomid XL ticks a lot of boxes, could get that with a DCF outer and silnylon inner for compression and abrasion resistance. Really like the canted pole design freeing up more space.

If friends in the states are a thing and you have time to kill? Dan Durston X-Mid 1 and X-Mid 2 are a crazily good deal and have a pretty solid reputation.

Other option here would be Aliexpress from China. 3F UL gear has a good reputation on the quality front. Essentially they are semi copies of the Lunar Solo and I would say the Zpacks Duplex with the Leaning Pisa one being the MLD Solomid. Pro versions are generally a bit larger, single walled and need seam sealing which suggests they are double sided silicone coatings which is nice. Improves tear resistance in nylon and removes the issue of hydrolysis as the tent ages.

Lanshan 1
Lanshan 2
Lanshan 1 Pro
Lanshan 2 Pro
Leaning Pisa

Sorry for the wall of texts and links! Went through the same hunt last year, so thought I would share :grimacing: Overall very happy with the move to it, and has served me well in the Cederberg so far.

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@Jaxz
Wow, thank you for the time and thoroughness of your reply.
I’m sure many hikers will appreciate this.
(When you mentioned 800gr we all got goosies. :joy:)

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